Posts Tagged ‘Jayson Werth

04
Jun
09

Energy from a bracelet

phitenFor the past three weeks, I’ve been wearing this aqua titanium-lined silicone bracelet that is supposed to energize me and improve my well-being.  Two friends who lead an active lifestyle and wear the bracelet attest its effectiveness as an energy booster.

This is how the Phiten bracelet, a red MLB Phillies (in homage to Jayson Werth yet I doubt if he wears one), has worked for me:

Of late, my swimming has been confined either to treading the water or wading into it at shoulder depth and then spending the time in it chatting with friends similarly situated. I haven’t swum beyond 10 meters in four years or so until last month.

I’ve been wearing the Phiten bracelet for three days when I swam toward an islet in Guiuan, Samar from a friend’s yacht that was anchored a little more than 50 meters away from shore. I swam back to the yacht after a huge lunch in the islet. It wouldn’t have been a big deal had my body been primed for such a distance.

kayak guiuanTaking the kayaks, my friends reached the islet and then later the yacht, way ahead of me. I might as well have been racing against an old turtle trudging land. I took my time, noting the depth of the waters as long-spined sea urchins became more visible as I got nearer the shore.

Warmed up by the swim in the seawater, I did laps in the 35-meter pool when we got back to The Surf Camp. I wasn’t sprinting like I had to beat Dara Torres’ record or the old turtle’s terrain time. The point being, after four years of not having swum long distance, meaning beyond 10 meters, I managed to crawl non-stop from one end of a 35-meter pool to the other.

The ScreamFrom the way I was catching my breath after the first lap, I saw myself as a meatier version of the subject of Edvard Munch’s painting, The Scream. I didn’t find my wind until after the third lap. I swam seven more laps, alternately using freestyle and breast stroke.

I woke up the next morning with a stiff neck.

I have a farm in FarmTown. Since I wore the Phiten bracelet, I now plow and plant faster and my right arm, where I wear it, feels less heavy after hours of moving the mouse.

Since I wore it, I sleep earlier and longer so much so that I have difficulty getting up at 5:15 a.m. to go to the track oval. My running shoes, worn only twice since I bought them, cry for my attention. Soon, shoes, soon.

I will not blame the Phiten bracelet for my hearty appetite because no amount of titanium, whether it be wrapped around my neck or my wrist, can restrain it.

When I told my acupuncturist about the Phiten bracelet, he dismissed its effect as nothing but placebo. Er, Doc, this bracelet, which looks like rubber to you, cost me almost P2,000.  For this sum, it should have an intrinsic remedial value. Wearing it I feel invigorated.

My acupuncturist, who is also a medical doctor, looked at me and said, “It’s the acupuncture that makes you feel energized.” Oh.

06
Nov
08

Post script on Jayson Werth

BBA-WORLD-SERIES-The mitt of the matter (Photo from AFP)

A father holds sentimental thoughts about his son and contemplates a future for him that brings with it his father’s past.

Whatever hopes Jayson Werth has for his son most likely include a spot in the baseball field in the major league.

Werth comes from a long line of baseball players. His grandfather and an uncle had played in MLB, and his dad in the minor league. His stepfather had also played with the NY Yankees. At one point in their baseball careers, Werth, his grandfather and his uncle had played for the LA Dodgers.

For Jayson Werth and his son, there will be more runs batted in, assuming, of course, his son won’t turn to wrestling. In that case, there will be smackdowns instead of homeruns.

BBA-WORLD-SERIES-Perfect! (Photo from AFP)

30
Oct
08

Werth’s cleats hanger

Victory on a dogpile

The Phillies won the World Series again after 28 years and Jayson Werth, who was only a year old when the Philadelphia baseball team won it first in 1980, finds his cleats heading to the Hall of Fame.

On the sixth inning of Game 5, resumed after 46 hours of delay caused by rain, Jayson Werth hit an RBI single and sent Geoff Jenkins to the home plate for a short-lived 3-2 lead. The Phillies eventually went to win the championship at 4-3 after Eric Bruntlett made the winning run on the seventh inning, in which the Rays likewise scored one. Neither team made it to home after that.

Safe to the plate for Jayson Werth, 5G, 3RBI, 1HR, 3SB

Werth, voice raspy from getting the colds, said of his spikes fame: “Gosh, what an honor… I mean, really, step back and think about that. I come from a long line of baseball players, and I’m thankful to them. My grandfather was a ballplayer. My stepdad [Dennis Werth] played in the big leagues. We’re just baseball players, not Hall of Famers. For me to have something go there to Cooperstown, that’s unbelievable.” (Quote from phillies.com)

So there, I got my answer to my question about Jayson Werth’s worth in the MLB.

Photos from AFP; more about Jayson Werth on http://www.phillies.com

29
Oct
08

Jayson Werth

Jayson Werth, No. 28, Phillies outfielder (Photo from AFP)

Major League Baseball (MLB) had never interested me until I saw Jayson Werth in the World Series Game 3 of the Phillies and Rays. I was surfing the sports channels to catch RF’s Basel matches when a handsome face appeared on ESPN. The Phillies lineup was being introduced.

I stopped clicking on the remote.

That’s how I got hooked on this year’s World Series–seeing Jayson Werth and finding him very maaaan.

The little knowledge I have about baseball comes from my having played softball in high school. (I was a terrible player, minding second base.) So I know when a pitch is a ball or a strike, when a batted ball is out, a slug or a bunt. But high school softball is a midget compared to league baseball.

I didn’t know what the stat initials that were being flashed on the tv screen during the games meant until I checked them out in all the sport books I have that mention baseball and in the comfortably reliable Wikipedia.

That’s why the book “Baseball: A Literary Anthology” that I bought online in 2002 finally got to be read, in part. The book includes articles by Stephen King and Richard Ford but I read only about why umpires are the most hated during a game.

I looked up Jayson Werth’s player stats but have yet to know how he ranks in the league. It doesn’t matter because I like what I see. He’s a right fielder, bats right, hits right. The Phillies is his third team, joining it in December 2007. He debuted in 2002 with the Toronto Blue Jays and was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2004 .

This post-season, he has hit two homeruns and has been caught stealing a base. I know because I watched Games 3, 4 and the rain-suspended 5.

Seeing him tower over the other players, who have an average height of six, I guessed that Jayson Werth is 6’5. I was right. He’s 29 and married with two kids.

Because of Jayson Werth, I’ve found MLB exciting to watch even if the scores are zero-zero in most of the nine innings. But really, Jayson Werth is worth watching.